Topic Sentences – Location, Location, Location!

Topic Sentences – Location, Location, Location!

At the beginning.

In blogs, videos, and my courses, I have often mentioned that the topic sentence of a sunrise-1756274_640paragraph should be at the beginning of the paragraph – often the first sentence.

While this is true in many cases, it does not HAVE to be the first sentence of a paragraph.  When writing essays for grade school or secondary school, teachers generally expect the topic sentence of body paragraphs to come at the beginning. The concluding paragraph has a restated or modified thesis statement at the beginning, and this serves as its topic sentence. Of course, the introductory paragraph is a bit of an exception.  It often starts with a “grabber” and/or focus statement, and the thesis statement (serving as the overarching topic sentence) comes at the end of the paragraph.

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For most stand-alone paragraph writing exercises in school, the expectation is for a topic sentence at or near the very beginning of the paragraph as well.


Having said all that, topic sentences can come at any point within a paragraph – even in academic writing at times.

At the end.

You can place the central idea at the end after several supporting sentences that have end-812226_640made the case for your argument or point of view. This can be especially useful in argument paragraphs because it leads the reader to your conclusion drawing them in with your amazing proofs and supports.

You knew you were amazing, right?  Of course.

Placing the topic sentence at the end of your paragraph can be effective in expository paragraphs as well. Leaving the central idea until the end can have a dramatic effect that attracts the reader to keep reading.

Of course, even if your topic sentence or central idea is withheld until the end of the paragraph, you still need to ensure that you have unity and coherence.  All the supports that come before the topic sentence need to be relevant and transition from one to another in order for the whole package to have the desired impact on the reader.  Remember that you have to “lead” them to your central idea and convince them with your message.

Nowhere – and everywhere.

Even more bizarre!

Some paragraphs don’t have the central idea explicitly stated at all! nowhere

This is often the case with narrative writing (relating a sequence of events) and sometimes descriptive writing.  This is especially true in fiction writing where many academic rules are “stretched” or broken.  You can imply the central idea with descriptions, action, dialogue, and so on. This is not to say that you never use topic sentences in fiction, but one topic sentence might serve several paragraphs rather than just one.  The continuity is important and, frankly, trying to generate a new topic sentence in the midst of a “flow” of description does not always make sense.

There you have it.  Topic sentences are not as stable as you thought.  They can move around from place to place.  Sometimes there are a couple of introductory sentences before a topic sentence as well.  Generally, I wouldn’t say the topic sentence comes in the middle of a paragraph, but it can be within it.

Still, for most academic writing, I recommend sticking to having the topic sentence at the beginning of most paragraphs.  It will serve you well.

When writing fiction, you have more freedom – but keep in mind that you still need to help the reader find your central idea using whatever techniques you choose.

Do you want to write more?  Do you want to improve your writing? Contact me, and I will set up a personal program for you. reading-86070_1920


This week’s video: Topic Sentences

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Don’t Hate Math!

Many students say they hate math.

Don’t hate math!

Math can be your friend.


For one thing, math always works, if you work it well.

A.   1 + 1 always = 2

B.   5 + 8 – 3(9) – 6 x 4 always equals -38

If you “plug in” the right numbers and do the right operations, you will win!plug-1459663_640

That is a great comfort.

It means that you can get 100% on a math quiz or test.  Yes – YOU!

Try to do that on an essay.  It’s tough.

Numbers don’t lie That is why they can be your friend.  They are reliable.  (Of course, people can use numbers to help them lie.  I realize that.)

Build a foundation.

Math skills are built one upon another, so starting with a strong foundation will always help you. 

Trying to multiply fractions will give you a headache if you don’t know how to emotions-2167461_640multiply whole numbers.

Trying to complete question B above will give you grief if you did not learn about order of operations.

Yes, it does take some time to strengthen the foundation and work your way toward the more complex questions.  Unfortunately, students often find themselves in a grade that they cannot handle, and this is the frustration.  They feel like they are banging their heads against the wall, working harder and harder and falling further behind.  Until they have the opportunity to step back (perhaps more than a few steps) and establish that base, they will never truly grasp math.  Worse, they will continue to hate it for the rest of their lives perhaps!

What a shame because…

You can conquer math.  The following tips are taken from my Student Survival Guide.  This free booklet is available for registering on the website.  Just click on the title above.

small Student Survival Cover

Strategies to help you get started on your LOVE of math

Read all explanations, directions, and examples carefully. 

Take a piece of scrap paper and write out a couple of the example questions, write out each step, write out the conclusion following the example in the book.  This procedure ensures that you really do know each step. 

Use scrap paper to do many rough calculations

You can always transfer your work to “show your work” once the question has been roughed out.

(If you are using a calculator, record each step on a piece of scrap as well, so you don’t lose your place within a longer question.)

Whenever possible connect new material to tasks already learned.

Monitor frequently.

Keep monitoring yourself to make sure you are understanding the passages or directions and examples you just read.

Stop, re-read, self-test – as often as necessary to grasp the concepts.

Frequent reviews, while important for all academic courses, are especially important for math.

Do not skip over entire sections you don’t understand

Mathematics tends to be cumulative (one skill built upon another), leaving out one of these building blocks will inevitably bring your entire construction down. 

In other words, you will be lost when it comes to more complex math later this term or next year. 

Get help if you need it.

(Watch for Discount Coupon below!) 

If you are unable to “work out” the math problem using your notes and textbook, ask someone, a teacher is best. 

Teachers know how they want you to approach certain tasks, so they are the best   teacher-2985521_640          resource for explaining the procedure. 

However, if the teacher is not available, a parent, another knowledgeable student, or a tutor may be able to help you. 

Don’t be afraid to tell someone that you don’t understand.

Having said this, don’t give up right away.  Make sure you have honestly tried to figure out the procedure.  The best way to truly learn mathematics is to work with it. 

Nobody simply looks at numbers and immediately grasps the concepts of algebra or geometry.  You must learn to be patient and spend time with the procedures, rules, and steps.

Many students think math is boring.  They think it is boring because they are trying to memorize everything rather than work with the numbers and concepts, understanding mathematics more holistically.

Try to get comfortable with math; bring it closer to you – it won’t bite.  Once you see how stable and reliable it is, you might find yourself falling in love with math after all. 

Next week, I will be writing Steps to Working Out a Math Problem

As always, I am here to help.  Check out the website and feel free to e-mail, ask questions, or leave a comment. 

Website:  www.tutoringcentral.comBurst_Purple_wow_left_purple

This week’s video:  Don’t Hate Math!

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Happy New Year & Making Resolutions

Happy New Year !

For many people it is the major “goal setting” time of the year – often called making resolutions.

People often see resolutions as different than goal setting, but I think they are the same in many ways.

Making New Year’s resolutions can be fun or it can be disastrous.  Many people become disheartened, discouraged, and even distraught after making and then breaking their New Year’s resolutions.

Here is how to avoid the downside of making resolutions.

  1. Make achievable goals.  Don’t simply say, “I will stop smoking on January 1st,” or “I non-smoking-2497308_640am going to drop twenty pounds,” or “I am going to get straight A’s by the end of the semester.”   Think about the steps you can take to get there, and make these separate, achievable resolutions.  There is no sense in setting yourself up for a fall.  Also, with a step-by-step plan, you have done the “legwork” necessary to get to the end. You know what you need to do.
  2. Write down your resolutions. Keep the list somewhere that you can access it frequently and check off the steps you made (note above). Writing things down seems to make them more tangible – more real.  Also, the act of writing out your goals allows you a chance to “think” about how you will make it happen.  It is easy for anyone to simply say or imagine becoming the next major movie star or adventurous astronaut, etc.  These are dreams until the plan is put into action.  Make it real!
  3. Jot down the positive aspects that you will receive when you reach your goal.  You need some motivators to keep you going.  For example, when you are not smoking – or even reducing those cigarettes, you won’t cough as much, you will have more energy and time to commit to more positive activities, etc.  When you lose the weight, you will fit into the clothes you’ve wanted to buy (or retrieve from the back of the closet), and you will feel more healthy and alive. Improved grades school-2.jpgcan get you into the advanced class, or into the college of your choice, and/or into the career you really want.
  4. Don’t let “slip ups” ruin your resolutions. Whenever you try something new, you are bound to have a few bumps in the road.  If that next test comes back with a C- on it, don’t despair, but do take steps to rectify the situation.  If you take a puff from another cigarette, or maybe a few at a party, don’t give up for another whole year! Get back on track and begin “working” your plan again.  (If you don’t have a plan, please refer back to step 1.) Recall how good it felt to make that resolution in the first place.  You can have that feeling again.  Pull out your list, see where you might have stumbled, and refresh your memory about the positive aspects you will get once you reach the ultimate goal. You will become re-energized to start again.
  5. Be positive.  Don’t keep thinking of the ways you will fail to achieve your resolutions.  Stay positive, think positively, and act in a positive direction.  Always focus on moving forward and taking the necessary steps.  If you need to revamp your plan – that’s fine.  Put in a few extra steps that will help you make those New Year’s goals a reality!

Of course, I would be remiss if I did not mention the obvious way to avoid the downside of making New Year’s resolutions – don’t make them.  You don’t HAVE to make resolutions.  It isn’t a law or rule.  For some people, it would be best not to make them.  You decide what works best for you.  Just remember, that the points mentioned above also apply to goal setting which I think most people should do at various times throughout the year.

So – Have a Happy New Year and if you decide to make New Year’s Resolutions, do so in a responsible way.  🙂

Have a safe holiday – enjoy yourself – and look forward to all of 2018.


Video:  Happy New Year

Merry Christmas! Happy Holidays! Happy Friday!

Christmas is a wonderful time to enjoy family and friends.

I want to wish all of you the very best for the holidays.  I know everyone has different traditions and beliefs, but it is always a positive thing to reconnect with those you love, whatever the occasion.

The holidays are also a fantastic time for learning.

Xmas tree 2 2017 (2)

Our actual tree this year.

You knew I was going there.

Yes.  Learning can happen at any time, but it does not need to be academic learning per se. For example, you can teach your children how to be patient when you are assembling their toys – or trying to figure out why the (fill-in-your-own choice words) toy won’t work.

Perhaps it isn’t a toy.  If might be that new bookshelf or desk that needs to be assembled from a wide variety of parts. My wife once bought me a desk that needed to be assembled.  Believe it or not, it was fun!  (Yes – I read directions, but then I am a relic.) And, yes, reading directions and following them carefully is an excellent learning opportunity.  this can be applied to board games and other games as well.

Card, dice, and board games bring the family together and can introduce lots of learning.  If a die or dice is involved, there will be counting, possibly adding or other math skills.

Cribbage fans know all the combinations for fifteen, for example.

Uno players learn about quickly adding up amounts and making executive decisions about which play to pursue – and often which one to sacrifice.

Chess, of course, can engage the planning and plotting parts of the brain – looking forward, predicting, and recalling patterns.

Crazy Eights, Go fish, Euchre, and other card games, both easy to learn and more challenging, bring lots of laughter (done right) and chances to learn about combinations, counting, and related math skills; however, as with all games, there are life lessons, too.  Patience, fair play, following the rules, and kindness all come to mind.  Learning to share and learning to lose with grace are so valuable.

Monopoly teaches a bit about money.  It isn’t too realistic but the broader aspects are still useful.

Sports of all kinds open up learning opportunities.  Go skiing, snowshoeing, sledding, orski skating.  Body movements, balance, and coordination are all components of learning.  Of course, running, hiking, exploring, and even indoor sports can be done in winter, too.

Reading blogs, books, and magazine articles about a favourite sport can open up the mind to new possibilities, unknown rules, and original moves you’ve never tried before.

Speaking of reading, reading aloud is an awesome activity on the holidays.  Themed stories about Hanukkah or Christmas, are always interesting, but any stories or book will do.  There is nothing wrong with adults reading aloud to children or teens and vice-versa.  For that matter, there is nothing wrong with adults reading to adults either – think audio books.

While reading, you can discuss the book.  Talk about the characters, the plot, or make predictions. In other words, make it fun!

For the more adventurous, try writing a Christmas story of your own.  Remember that a holiday story can go in any direction.  It can be sweet and joyful, it can be mysterious and suspenseful, or it can take a frightening twist into horror.  (Ooohhh that evil elf!)

Cooking and baking all those holiday treats can be a super learning experience.  Think about measuring, temperatures, following directions (relic in training?), adjusting amounts, and so on.  Of course, eating the treats is a motivating factor. KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Social gatherings, whether with family, friends, or a mixture (perhaps even a few strangers mixed in), provide learning skills that will serve people for the rest of their lives.  Social learning and social proficiency is often overlooked, yet it is so important -particularly in today’s society.  Some people who are brilliant academically are hampered by a lack of social ability.  It can be a real disability leading to failure in the job market, depression, addiction, and a much less joyful life.  Don’t overlook the importance of getting Johnny or Sally out and about, meeting people and learning to do a little polite small talk.  Many of the earlier activities mentioned have a social component as well.

You will have noticed that a combination of these activities would include visual, auditory, kinesthetic, speaking, reading, and writing.  All the different kinds of learning styles.

I could go on and on, but I won’t.

I promise.

Oh, wait, there is also…

No, I said I’d stop.  That’s my Christmas gift to you.  I won’t be so verbose – just this once.

Wishing you all the very best over the holiday,



Video:  Merry Christmas!

15 Questions to Ask When Looking for a Tutor

15 Questions to Ask When Looking for a Tutor


1.      What do you tutor?

There is no sense in having a long conversation if the tutor does not teach the subject you need.

2.    Where do you tutor?

Some tutors travel to the client’s home, some tutors meet in a neutral location, and some tutors have the client come to them.

Don’t forget online tutoring! 

Many tutors will use a combination of one of the methods above with online tutoring or do all of their teaching online.

If you have any issues with the location of the lessons, ask the tutor why he or she chooses to teach in this way.  You might be surprised that a method will work for you even though you never thought about it.

3.   How long is each tutoring session? How often do you meet with the student?eder-pozo-perez-32852

4.   What is your availability?

If the tutor does not have any spots available or nothing that will accommodate your schedule, then you can decide to continue on with the conversation or not.  It might still be a great idea to get to know the tutor for future reference.

5.   What are your qualifications, certifications or credentials?

While qualifications are important, there are a wide variety of qualifications. Is the tutor able to express himself or herself well in describing his or her strengths? It is more important that the tutor feels comfortable with the teaching process than his or her having a PhD.

6.   How long have you been tutoring?

Again, this should not be the only deciding factor.  Someone new to tutoring would not have a lot of experience, but she or he might still be an excellent tutor.  Of course, one with lots of experience has probably dealt with many different learning styles and has gone well beyond the lessons learned from textbooks or teacher’s college into the real world of teaching and learning.

7.   Can you tell me a little bit about your teaching philosophy?shield-108065_640

Get to know the tutor by discussing education overall and his or her feelings and thoughts about the importance of learning.  This gives both of you a chance to speak more freely and get to know one another.  You can often begin to get a “feel” that this is the right fit. If a tutor cannot clearly express himself or herself about teaching and students, it might be time to look a little further.

8.   Have you worked before with students who have learning challenges?

This question would not apply to everyone, but many parents are looking for a tutor to handle an identified student.  Even without a formal identification, a student might have issues with attention, dyslexia, or other learning challenges that require remediation.  A tutor who has worked with these kinds of issues will have tools and strategies to help.

9.  How do you assess students?

What kind of tools does the tutor use to discover a student’s current abilities and challenges? How will these tools be used to generate a useful program? Is the tutor willing and able to incorporate results from other assessments?

10.  How do you design the student’s program?

Will the program be flexible or static?  Will the program be homework support only, or will the program be solely based on the tutoring materials?  Of course, flexible programs might include a homework support component as well as lessons to strengthen a student’s foundation.

11 .  What kind of reporting do you provide?

You might discuss the kind and amount of contact available between reports as well.

12.   How can I help in the learning process?

Are there things that I can do at home to help improve the results?

13.  How much do you charge per session?piggy-2889042_640

Please, do not hire a tutor solely based on price!  This is such a bad idea, but something a lot of people do.  Cheap is not always the best choice – particularly when we are talking about developing someone’s brain and helping them gain the skills they will need for the rest of their lives.

14.   Are there any other additional fees for materials, phone calls, assessments, extra homework practice, etc.?

A tutor should always be up-front about the cost of tutoring.  Unfortunately, sometimes there are a lot of hidden fees.   You should be fair as well.  If a tutor is providing a lot of extra practice, she or he has to prepare the materials, read over and mark the answers, and include all of this in their reporting method.  Doing the extra work might need to be rewarded.

15.   What is the policy for cancellations and make-up sessions?

Keep in mind that pedagogically the student should be consistent and available for his or her sessions or to make them up as soon as possible.  To be fair, this also makes sense for the tutor from a business perspective.  Your goal and the tutor’s goal should be to achieve as many sessions as possible on the right day and time.

These questions will get you started.  I can’t stress enough how important it is to find a tutor that will work with you or your child’s particular challenges and goals in mind.  julia-raasch-143428Look for a tutor who won’t simply “plug-in” your child to a program designed for all. Learning is not the same for everyone, so the program for your child should not be identical to the one for thousands more!


This week’s video:  Questions to Ask When Looking for a Tutor


Tools and Platforms for Online Tutoring

Tutors, parents, and learners will all find some useful information in this one.

Today there are so many tools and platforms that tutors and students can use that geography is no longer an issue.  Missed sessions are basically no longer an issue either.  slava-bowman-161206You can’t make your in-person session?  No problem, we can do an online session!

We can teach students from anywhere in the world; and, of course, we can learn from a teacher from anywhere in the world.  (You know I believe that all learners are teachers and all teachers are learners – or should be.)

It used to be that seeing and hearing your student in real time was almost impossible.  Writing or drawing together in real time sharing – forget it!

Not any more.

Now, we can do all of this and a whole lot more.

I see you! jordan-whitfield-107094

With Skype, Zoom, and/or BitPaper (to name a few), the tutor and student can see, hear, and share real time writing, typing, drawing, videos, etc.  We can import documents to share, and we can make them editable. In other words, the student can make notes, changes, highlight, or draw something right on the same document.

But wait…there’s more!

We can save our sessions.  We can save the recordings (if recording, of course) or the altered documents – or both.

Being able to see each other means that we won’t miss facial expressions and other cues that we use when communicating in person. If you are like me, sometimes your hands are almost as important as your speech when communicating.  With the camera set properly, we can share these expressions as well.

There are other ways to share documents.  Here are a few options:

Many sites allow you to assign math problems or reading passages to students.  You can also print exercises for your “in person” clients.

If you are not “live,” you can still send audio files, video files, and – of course- text files and documents.

Some courses are asynchronous.  For these, the student completes tasks on his or her own.  These are for more independent learners or as an entry into more complex courses. I have asynchronous courses for English, math, and study skills.  Students watch videos and slideshows, read texts, complete quizzes and assignments, and receive a certificate when they complete the course.  While some asynchronous courses don’t, mine allow contact with the instructor and even feedback on some of the assignments.

Other resources (and there are thousands of them) include the following:

Trello – organize yourself and/or collaborate with teams.

Evernote – another organizer and so much more.

Eastoftheweb – short stories and word games.

Braingenie – mostly math & science (part of

The Math Worksheet Site – generate various math sheets.

Desmos -graphing. – read and borrow books – free language arts material. – instant writing challenges.

Youtube – videos.

There are thousands of tools and platforms that tutors and learners can use.  I have mentioned some of the ones I have used – and continue to learn how to use.  All of the resources I mentioned here are free (at the time of writing this) – so there is no reason not to try them out.

In future blogs, I will explain more about the individual platforms and tools.

If you are a tutor, check out some of these and incorporate them into your toolbox.

If you are a parent, now you can see that online tutoring is a fantastic avenue for your child (or even yourself).

There are no longer any barriers to learning!

Are you interested in taking some online lessons or courses?  Get in touch, and see how great it can be. julia-raasch-143428


This weeks video:  Platforms and Tools online.

How Do I Pay Attention? Seven tips.

How do I pay attention?

A lot of students struggle with this one.

Paying attention is essential to learning from lectures and presentations, but you need an attention span to get the most out of your reading as well.

Often students will ask me, “But how do I pay attention?”

Or they will say, “I just can’t pay attention.”

If you have difficulties paying attention, don’t despair!


There are some active steps you can take that will help you improve.  It will take some effort, I’m afraid; however, the best rewards come from some degree of effort.  If you put your mind to it and follow through, you can improve your attention span. (In other words, if you don’t apply the techniques, you won’t see any change.)

First:          Stop telling yourself that you can’t pay attention.

Second:     Make a commitment to change.

Third:       Create a list of places / times in which you need to pay better attention.

Fourth:     Use a physical reminder.

Fifth        Ask yourself questions.

Sixth:        Get interested.

Seventh:   Practise “tuning out” extraneous noises.

Here is a little more on each of the points above.

Stop telling yourself that you cannot pay attention.  Negative messages only exacerbate the situation. They don’t provide solutions.  You need to be more positive and tell yourself that you can learn to improve. Just because you have limits now does not mean you can never change! Imagine if you just gave up the first time you tried to walk or the first time you tried to talk.  You didn’t know how to say words or string them together into sentences.  Imagine that you thought to yourself at the time, “Well, I simply cannot speak, so I’ll just keep babbling and grunting.”  I know this seems like a silly analogy, but it really isn’t.  Give up the lame excuse!

Making a commitment to change will help you stay on track. Write it down somewhere that you can see it – perhaps a sticky note on your computer or iPad (there are electronic sticky notes) or on your wall or notebook.  “I will improve my attention span.”

Creating a list of times or places in which you need to boost your ability to pay attention will give you a concrete (perhaps literally) starting point. (If your list is long, you might want to chose one or two places to begin.) For example, many people have no issues paying attention to a video game for hours, so that is not the place to start! You already pay attention.  You need to think of arenas in which your attention span is weak – perhaps in chemistry class.  That is where you will begin to make change.


Use a physical reminder to “snap” your attention back to the task at hand.  For example, place an elastic band on your wrist.  When you notice your attention beginning to waver, give your elastic a little “snap.” (If you are in class you’ll need to do this quietly.) It is not intended to hurt – just to remind you that you are off track.  Of course, then you have to consciously focus on what you are supposed to be doing. Remember that you are taking action and control.

Another method is to simply place a “tick” on the margin of your notes every time you realize that your attention is getting away from you.

Be brutal with yourself.

Well, not literally, but take a very proactive approach to developing this good habit.  It always takes more effort to develop a good habit than to fall into a bad habit; but, once ingrained, you will find yourself following through automatically.

Ask yourself questions.  When listening to a lecture, podcast, video, or when reading gold_question_marktext – ask yourself questions (remember SQ3R – check that blog/video if not).  Asking yourself questions keeps you looking for answers.  When you are looking or listening for answers, you are engaged. (Don’t worry you don’t have to buy a ring or get married!  It’s not that kind of engagement.)

Remember:  You do not need fireworks to stay involved! With a little (or a lot at first) effort, you will surprised how fulfilling having a deeper understanding can be.  You will be much more satisfied not only with your performance but also with your ability to discuss topics intelligently as you continue to expand your horizons.

We don’t know what we don’t know.  Don’t you want everything you can get out of an education or, for that matter, your life? Increasing your ability to pay attention can help you achieve and excel.

Get interested.  When the teacher is talking, force yourself (make a concerted effort) to be interested – even if you aren’t.  In other words, fake it until you make it.  By making yourself focus even when you think something might be boring, you will begin to rewire your brain.  It’s true – particularly if you are young.  With effort, you can literally change the connections (synapses) within your brain and the concurrent chemistry that helps you think and respond – or not.


I can change my brain.  Yes, you can!

If you take the same approach with parents, friends, even random conversations at parties, and so on, you will soon begin to realize that you are hearing more, incorporating more, and learning more.  Now, some of the data might be unimportant, but that can easily be released.  (Unless it is a horrible advertising jingle, and then you are doomed for days.)

Practice “tuning out” any noises or activity around you that does not add to your learning experience.  Obviously, you will ultimately want to do this in class, but you can start at home if that’s easier.  Pick one person to talk to or one activity (dare I say homework) and do only that.  No texting, phoning, fidget spinning, singing along with beach-handstandsyour favourite tunes, or handstands – just focus.

How do I pay attention?

You pay attention.  (Are you thinking of making an excuse? Go back to step one.)

Yes, there is a wee cost, but the benefits are well worth it.  As with anything else, the more you do it the easier it becomes.

Try these suggestions, and don’t give up even if you fail a few times (or a few hundred times).  Keep resetting and genuinely giving yourself a chance to improve.

Be proud of any honest moves forward.  You will soon see that the pride of improving yourself is much more valuable than money, candy, or any other material reward.

Let me know how you do.

Tutors help.  Seek out a mentor or educational coach that can guide you.

Don’t be shy to take advantage of my free information meeting.

Get in touch, and I will set it up for you.


This week’s video: How Do I Pay Attention?